Latest Property Taxes

Property Taxes

Our Property Tax data is derived from us census data released on December 7th.

The latest data available is data from December 7th, 2022.

This data is predictive and is gathered over a 5 year period via the U.S. Census.

We ensure that our property Tax data is accurate within a 1.09% magin of error.

We calculate property Taxes based on the average home value and average Property Tax Rate Paid in an area.

Average Property Tax Rate Rates by state

The map below shows average Property Tax Rate Rates in each state. Click on the map to see a detailed breakdown by county.

Minimum Property Tax Rate
Maximum Property Tax Rate

States(51)

Overseas Territories (1)

Property Taxes Tables

National Average Property Taxes

1.05%
Property Tax Rate
×
$188,400
Property Value
$1,981
Property Tax Paid
Highs and Lows
Lowest Highest
Property Tax Rate 0.27% (Hawaii) 2.33% (New Jersey)
Property Value $145,800 (West Virginia) $764,800 (Hawaii)
Property Tax Paid $701 (Alabama) $9,345 (New Jersey)

Always Up-to-Date

This page will be updated each year to show the latest available Property Taxes.

Breaking Down Property Taxes

Property taxes account for the entire value of the buildings and the land on the plot.

What is a Mill Rate?

The mill levy is also known as the millage tax or mill rate. Tax Assessors use the mill levy to calculate property tax rates. Each school and city district near the property determine the mill levy. Each entity has its own boundaries. If a property is in multiple boundaries, the sum of the rates are the millage rate.

Mill rates represent $1 per $1000 dollars of the assessed property value.

How to Calculate Property Taxes Property Tax Rate?

Property taxes equal the assessed property value multiplied by the local tax rate. To find the assessed property value contact your local tax office or look on your property tax bill. If you qualify for any tax exemptions or deductions these can lower your tax value. These exemptions include:

  • Senior Citizens
  • Veteran Status
  • Disability
  • Home improvement
  • Green energy
  • Energy Efficiency

How to Calculate Property Taxes Based on Mill Rate?

Millage Rate represents one-tenth of a percentage paid on a property as property tax. For example a mill of 20 means that you must pay 2.0% of the property's assessed value as property tax. Property tax rate times ten equals mill rate

You can find property tax rate for your area by clicking on the map above.

Property Tax due = Property Tax Rate × (Assessed Property Value - Deductions)

How we Calculate Property Tax Rates From Census Data

The U.S. Census gathers cumulative property tax data over a five year period. We calculate our Property Taxes based on Property Value and Property Tax Paid from this Census Data.

We use two U.S. Census data sources containing data for each area. One containing median home values and the other containing property Property Tax Paid. Property Property Tax Paid divided by Property Value approximates property tax rate.

$2,000 ÷ $200,000 = 0.01 1% Property Tax

How are Property Taxes Established?

All areas in the United States base their property taxes on a percentage of assessed home value. Our data is based on U.S. Census data gathered over a five year period.

How are Property Taxes Assessed?

County or Municipality tax assessors value properties every one to five years. The owner pays a tax rate based on the standards set by local taxing authorities.

Property Taxes vary within every state and county. Read on to learn more about how property taxes are established and used.

Who Establishes Property Taxes?

Property taxes are levied by local entities including:

  • Counties
  • Cities
  • School Districts

How are Property Taxes Used By Communities?

Property taxes are one of the most important income sources for communities.

School districts and County/City boards meet to determine the needed mill rates. They also determine how the money from property taxes is used.

Property Taxes cover services including:

  • Education
  • Emergency
  • Public Transportation
  • Recreation
  • Parks
  • Libraries

Property Tax History (2010 - 2022)

The graph shows minimum and maximum Property Taxes in each year since 2010.

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Data Source

Census Seal

Cenus Data is published by the U.S. census.